World Polio Day: Plymouth Rotary Fights to End Polio Worldwide

 
In honor of World Polio Day, which is widely recognized on Oct. 24, Plymouth Rotary is striving to make a difference as part of Rotary’s 27-year mission to eradicate the crippling childhood disease polio. Plymouth Rotary has been raising funds locally toward the effort, and Chapter President Dustin Turicik has personally pledged matching funds to help fuel awareness. 
 
 
PLYMOUTH, WI — In honor of World Polio Day, which is widely recognized on Oct. 24, Plymouth Rotary is striving to make a difference as part of Rotary’s 27-year mission to eradicate the crippling childhood disease polio. Plymouth Rotary has been raising funds locally toward the effort, and Chapter President Dustin Turicik has personally pledged matching funds to help fuel awareness. 
 
World Polio Day follows a succession of significant developments that have made 2015 one of the most important years in the history of the polio eradication initiative. The message to world leaders is clear: Support the final push to achieve eradication now while the goal has never been closer, or face the potential consequences of a new polio pandemic that could affect millions of children within a decade.
 
Since 1985 Rotary has contributed nearly $1.2 billion and countless volunteer hours to the protection of more than two billion children in 122 countries. The disease remains endemic in three countries — Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan — although other countries remain at risk from imported cases.
 
“Polio is a devastating disease that historically impacted an insuperable number of people. The effort to eliminate polio is nearly complete due to the efforts of Rotary and many others worldwide,” said Plymouth Rotary President Dustin Turicik. “Being a part of Rotary means making in impact on this world in a positive way that shapes and enhances lives for the generations that will follow.”
 
A highly infectious disease, polio causes paralysis and is sometimes fatal. As there is no cure, the best protection is prevention. For as little as 60 cents worth of vaccine, a child can be protected against polio for life. After an international investment of more than $9 billion and the successful engagement of over 200 countries and 20 million volunteers, polio could be the first human disease of the 21st century to be eradicated.
 
The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is spearheaded by the World Health Organization, Rotary International, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the United Nations Children’s Fund. It includes the support of governments and other private sector donors.